Making a Music Video

The Process of Making a Music Video

Production of music videos has changed throughout the years, as a result of the rapid advancements in technology. This has allowed production companies to experiment in various ways and churn out some spectacular music videos that are eternally played in the minds of humans. Although production has become technical and far more robust than in previous decades, the method of making music videos can be broadly categorized into three processes. Of course, it is important to note that not all of them have set guidelines in any stage of the production, but still rings through to a certain framework that directors and producers have followed long since.

The Pre-Production

This is the stage where a lot of the planning happens. Depending on the directors, the video may reverberate the message of the song through meaningful visuals or in some other form. One thing that is certain though is the selection of the equipment going to be utilised, a location and chronological drawings of how the video should be when it is a finished product. Props, decorations and green screens are other elements that are often needed by directors to blend in visual effect with live shooting.

Production

Here, the selected crew would utilise the special equipment for the video and capture footage from various angles, so as to obtain as much material as possible to create the perfect music video production. Normally a record of shots is duly noted, in order to make the post-production stage a more easier task, as filming generally results in a number of shots being taken, not only of the performers but also of the environment that could contribute to the artistry of the music video. This is often one of the hardest stages, as a lot of things may not go according to plan, thus making improvisation quite the norm during this stage.

The Post-Production

After the necessary shots have been captured and recorded in an organised manner, it is now time to piece the puzzle. This is the stage where editing of the captured footage and pictures are done. Here, it is imperative that the production team is tech savvy and utilises the latest and greatest of software and hardware. Moreover, this also allows the production team to also add in content from other sources, such as stock footage. As long as these have been obtained through the proper channels, copyright infringements are not a problem.

Each of these processes may be executed in a different manner, depending on the needs of the record label, production company, and the director. However, it is apparent that all of them would follow the three mentioned processes, as it makes the production all the easier to execute and all the easier to satisfy the requirements needed by the particular clients. Even if a satisfactory outcome does not occur, production companies could easily retrace their steps to see what really went wrong and what they could do to fix the wrongdoing.

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